Prescriptions

A Physician’s Prescription is optional for International shipments, and mandatory for USA shipments.

For all USA shipments, a prescription is required by law per the US Code of Federal Regulations 21CFR801.109 “Prescription Devices”. 

Even if a prescription is not required, Solarc advises the Responsible Person to seek the advice of a physician, and ideally a dermatologist, because:

  • The physician’s diagnosis is needed to determine if UVB phototherapy is the best treatment option
  • The physician is in the best position to judge if the patient is likely to use the device responsibly
  • The physician plays a role in the ongoing safe use of the device, including regular follow-up skin exams

The prescription can be written by any medical doctor (MD) or nurse-practitioner, including, of course, your own General Practitioner (GP) – it does not have to be written by a dermatologist. Solarc uses the words “physician” and “healthcare professional” interchangeably to define this group.

 Your physician can write your prescription:

  • On a traditional paper prescription pad
  • In the form of a letter on the physician’s letterhead
  • Using the “Physician’s Approval” section in the paper Solarc Ordering Form 

To submit your prescription to Solarc, please upload it during the online ordering process. Alternatively, you can:

  • Scan it and email it to orders@solarcsystems.com
  • Take a picture of it on your smartphone and email it to orders@solarcsystems.com
  • Fax it to 1.705.739.9684
  • Send it by letter mail to: Solarc Systems, 1515 Snow Valley Road, Minesing, ON, L9X 1K3, Canada.
  • If using the paper Solarc Ordering Form, tape the top edge of the prescription where indicated and submit the completed signed Ordering Form using any of the four methods listed above.

Remember to keep a copy of your prescription for your records. Solarc does not require the original.

 

What Should the Prescription Say?

What the prescription says is up to your Healthcare Professional, but probably the best generic choice is:

“UV Home Phototherapy Device for xxxxxx”

Where xxxxxx is your “intended purpose / indication for use”, such as: psoriasis, vitiligo, atopic dermatitis (eczema), Vitamin D deficiency, or any one of many other photoresponsive skin disorders.

RATIONALE:

There are no particular requirements for what the prescription says, but it should, as a minimum, say that it is for an “ultraviolet device”, and ideally that it is for use in the “home”. 

So it can be simply: “Ultraviolet home phototherapy device” or even just “home UV unit”, but that puts the onus on the Responsible Person to know what waveband they should be using, which for almost everyone is “UVB-Narrowband”, but it could be some other waveband for special cases.

The prescription could also be more detailed and include the device and waveband type, for example “SolRx 1780UVB-NB Home Phototherapy Unit” or “Full Body UVB-Narrowband device”, but that leaves less flexibility in case later you prefer a different device. But in some cases the physician may insist on a certain device, for example the 500-Series for use on different parts of the body on different days for patients with limited UV tolerance, such as those with a Vitamin D receptor mutation with a viral component.

The prescription could also include the skin disorder it is intended to treat, such as “Home UV unit for psoriasis”. This might help if an insurance company is involved. 

The choice is up to your Healthcare Professional, but probably the best generic choice is therefore:

“UV Home Phototherapy Device for xxxxxxx”

Where xxxxxxx is the “intended purpose / indication for use”, such as: psoriasis, vitiligo, atopic dermatitis (eczema), Vitamin D deficiency, or any one of many other skin disorders responsive to UV phototherapy.